Leadership
Forgot password?
To support, advance and enhance lifelong learning through the use of collaborative technologies and innovations.
Share |
Text Size: Smaller Text Larger Text

Program Flyer: Creating a New Government: Famous Virginians, Founding Documents

Request this Program Now

Content Provider   HistoryConnects from the Virginia Historical Society  2012-13 Honorable Mention, 2013-14
Contact Information   Evan Liddiard
eliddiard@vahistorical.org
428 North Boulevard
Richmond, VA  23220
United States
Phone: (804) 342-9689
Program Type   Individual Program
Program Rating      based on 4 evaluation(s).
Target Audience   Education: Grade(s): 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, Parent, Adult Learners, community college, Public Library: Library Patrons, Retirement center
Maximum Number of Participants   No Maximum, but we suggest about 30 students.
Minimum Number of Participants   5
Primary Disciplines   Fine Arts, Language Arts/English, Problem Solving, Social Studies/History, Standards
Program Description   Virginians played an essential role in the creation of the new American nation. From actions during and following the American Revolution to ideas and documents that established the new country, Virginians were involved at every point. During this program students will learn more about the lives of Virginia’s founding fathers, such as George Washington, Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and George Mason, while also examining some of the most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence, the Virginia Statue for Religious Freedom, the Virginia Declaration of Rights, and the United States Constitution.
Program Format   1. The program will begin with an introduction to several prominent Virginians and an examination of their role in establishing the new country.
2. The audience will then examine several founding documents in American history.
3. The audience will discuss the link between these documents and Virginians while determining their impact on American history.
4. The program will end with time for a Question and Answer period.
Objectives   The participant will:
-identify the prominent Virginians involved with the American Revolution and the founding of the new country;
- describe how Virginians and Virginia documents impacted the rest of the colonies and new country;
- discuss the importance of these founding documents throughout American history.
National/Common Core Standards to which this program aligns   Our programs are aligned with both national standards and Virginia Standards of Learning. While our programs can be tailored to suit learners of any age, they are initially designed for students in upper elementary and secondary schools.

Topic 3: The History of the United States: Democratic Principles and Values and the Peoples from Many Cultures Who Contributed to Its Cultural, Economic and Political Heritage
Standard 4 : How Democratic Values Came to Be, and How They Have Been Exemplified by People, Events, and Symbols

REVOLUTION AND THE NEW NATION (1754-1820S)
Standard 2: The impact of the American Revolution on politics, economy, and society
Standard 3: The institutions and practices of government created during the Revolution and how they were revised between 1787 and 1815 to create the foundation of the American political system based on the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

Common Core
Grade Two
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.3 : Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.4 : Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.6 : Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.
Grade Three
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.3.1 : Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.3.3 : Describe the relationships between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.3.7 : Use information gained from illustrations and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (eg, where, when, why, and how key events occur).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.3.9 : Compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.
Grade Four
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.3 : Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text , including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.4 : Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.6 : Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and information provided.
Grade Five
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.3 : Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.4 : Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.6 : Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.7 : Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
Grade Six-Eight
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.6-8.1 : Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.6-8.2 : Determine the central ideas or information of primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.6-8.3 : Identify key steps in a text's description of a process related to history/social studies.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.6-8.7 : Integrate visual information (eg., photographs or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.6-8.9 : Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.
Grade Nine-Ten
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1 : Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.3 : Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.9 : Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.
Grade Eleven-Twelve
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.4 : Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.7 : Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media in order to address a question or solve a problem.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.9 : Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.
State/Regional Standards to which this program aligns   Virginia Standards: Virginia Studies
VS.6 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the role of Virginia in the establishment of the new American nation by
a)explaining why George Washington is called the “Father of our Country” and James Madison is called the “Father of the Constitution”;
b)identifying the ideas of George Mason and Thomas Jefferson as expressed in the Virginia Declaration of Rights and the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom;
c)explaining the influence of geography on the migration of Virginians into western territories.

United States History to 1865
USI.7 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the challenges faced by the new nation by
a)identifying the weaknesses of the government established by the Articles of Confederation;
b)describing the historical development of the Constitution of the United States;
c)describing the major accomplishments of the first five presidents of the United States.

Virginia and U.S. History
VUS.5 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the issues involved in the creation and ratification of the Constitution of the United States and how the principles of limited government, consent of the governed, and the social contract are embodied in it by
a)explaining the origins of the Constitution, including the Articles of Confederation;
b)identifying the major compromises necessary to produce the Constitution, and the roles of James Madison and George Washington;
c) examining the significance of the Virginia Declaration of Rights and the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom in the framing of the Bill of Rights;
d)assessing the arguments of Federalists and Anti-Federalists during the ratification debates and their relevance to political debate today;
e) appraising how John Marshall’s precedent-setting decisions established the Supreme Court as an independent and equal branch of the national government.
Program Length   60 minutes
By Request   This program is available by request ONLY
Date/Time Notes   Programs are available Monday through Friday, between 8 am and 4 pm, EST.
If these times do not work for your group, please contact Evan Liddiard at eliddiard@vahistorical.org and we will make every effort to find a convenient time for your program.
Program Cost   Point to Point Cost: $100.00
By Request Cost: $100.00
Program Fee Notes   Programs are offered at a 50% discount for Virginia schools.
Cancellation Policy   We will not charge for programs cancelled due to nature i.e. snow days. The full fee will be charged to sites which cancel with less than 48 hours notice.
Is recording allowed?   No
Program Delivery Mode(s)   Videoconference - H.323 (Polycom, Cisco/Tandberg, LifeSize, etc...)
Videoconference – Webcam/desktop (Skype, iChat, FieldTripZoom, Vidyo, Movi/Jabber, Blue Jeans, etc...)
Webinar
Other: Zoom
Minimum Technology Specifications for sites connecting to this provider   All schools will dial into the VHS.

IP address: 38.68.255.194

For H.323 video conferencing systems (Polycom, Tandberg, Cisco, Lifesize), groups should dial into us directly via IP connections or through a bridging agent, at an ideal connection speed of at least 384 kbps.

Our programming is also available to groups who do not have access to video conferencing equipment through the use of free cloud-based video conferencing software. Software configuration and connection instructions will be sent out once we have received your program request form.

We require a test call be scheduled at least one week prior to the date of your program in order to verify that we can maintain an acceptable connection between our sites.

Request this Program Now
It is necessary to have a PIN to request a connection. Find out how to get your free PIN, or Find your PIN.
For additional assistance, phone 866-826-2452.

Forward this Program Flyer
Go Back

Follow Us:   Follow us on Facebook  Follow us on Twitter  Follow us on Pinterest  Follow us on Tumblr  Follow us on LinkedIn  |  RSS Feeds

Home | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Contact Us | Website Assistance: 866-826-2452 / helpdesk@cilc.org