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First Long Islanders: Original Native American Inhabitants

from The Ward Melville Heritage Organization

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Would you have survived a summer on Long Island’s wetland habitat 5000 years ago?

Based on WMHO’s historic archaeological dig in 1960 that unearthed evidence of a 5000-year-old encampment of an Algonquin peoples, students will be engaged in an interactive survival game!  They will be challenged with surviving on a wetland habitat using and also conserving the natural resources of the marsh to provide shelter, food and even medicine.   Traveling back in time, students explore how Native Americans made use of their environment in their daily lives. The instructor engages students in an interactive discussion that focuses on the available environmental resources and community roles in Long Island’s Algonquin community prior to European colonization.

Program Rating


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About This Program

Cost

Point to Point: $150.00



Length

45 minutes with question and answer session


Target Audience

Education: Grade(s) 2, 3, 4, 5, 6Public Library: Library Patrons

Minimum participants:

none

Maximum participants:

For optimum interactivity, we suggest no more then 30 students


Primary Disciplines

Social Studies/History, Sciences


Program Delivery Mode

Videoconference - H.323 (Polycom, Cisco/Tandberg, LifeSize, etc...)
Videoconference – Webcam/desktop (Zoom, Google Meet, Cisco WebEx, GoToMeeting, Microsoft Teams, Blue Jeans, etc...)
Google Hang Out
Zoom
Skype
Microsoft Teams



Booking Information

Book it!

Receive this program and 9 more for one low price when you purchase the CILC Virtual Expeditions package. Learn more

For more information contact CILC at (507) 388-3672

Provider's Cancellation Policy

Please Note: Two weeks notice is required for all cancellations and re-schedules without penalty.

About This Provider

Content Provider logo

 

The Ward Melville Heritage Organization

Stony Brook, NY
United States

The Ward Melville Heritage Organization is proud to offer state-of-the-art programming across the arts and sciences from our authentic historic and environmental properties.  Broadcasting live from Long Island’s historic and
environmental landmarks, WMHO supports NY State and Common Core Standard
learning by creating rich virtual environment where students study and observe
artifacts, primary sources, and participate in an exchange of ideas. WMHO’s
digital platform include (and are not limited to) Zoom, Google Classroom and MS
Teams. 

Contact:
Deborah Boudreau
eddirector@wmho.org
6317512244

Program Details

Format

Facilitator Greeting

Introduction - The instructor will orient the students to the North Shore of Long Island, NY and the region of the archaeological dig.

Mini Lesson - The instructor will discuss the of Native American's interaction with the natural world. Artifacts will be utilized and the program will specifically focus on the mineral, plant, and animal worlds. In addition, the role of Algonquian family members will be discussed..

Game: Working in teams, students have to determine the best options for finding food, medicine and shelter.

Conclusion (3 minutes) The program will conclude with a question and answer session. The class will be encouraged to continue the exploration of the subject with the post lesson activities provided.

Objectives

Introduction - The instructor will orient the students to the North Shore of Long Island, NY and the region of the archaeological dig.

Mini Lesson - The instructor will discuss the of Native American's presence on Long Island dating back to 10,000 years ago and the interaction with the natural world that sustained the family while also conserving natural resources. Artifacts will be utilized to help student understand the creation of tools for surviving on Long Island through the paleolithic, archaic, and woodland periods. In addition, the role of Algonquian family members will be discussed.

Game: We immerse children in the environment of West Meadow Creek 5000 years ago when an algonquin community summered there West Meadow Creek for the numerous resources the environment provides. Working in teams, students will have to provide for their food, shelter and medicine. But when a storm hits, can they survive over the long-term? How can they conserve their resources so they will last for multiple generations?

Conclusion (3 minutes) The program will conclude with a question and answer session. The class will be encouraged to continue the exploration of the subject with the post lesson activities provided.

Standards Alignment

State Standards

CIVICS
NSS.K-12
What are important responsibilities of Americans?
How can citizens take part in civic life?

ECONOMICS
NSS.K-4
Scarcity:
Productive resources are the natural resources, human resources, and capital goods available to make goods and services. Natural resources, such as land, are "gifts of nature;" they are present without human intervention. Human resources are the quantity and quality of human effort directed toward producing goods and services.
NSS.5-8
Scarcity:
Like individuals, governments and societies experience scarcity because human wants exceed what can be made from all available resources.
Allocation of Goods and Resources:
People in all economies must address three questions: What goods and services will be produced? How will these goods and services be produced? Who will consume them?
NSS.K-12
MARGINAL COST/BENEFIT:
To determine the best level of consumption of a product, people must compare the additional benefits with the additional costs of consuming a little more or a little less.
Role of Money:
The basic money supply in the United States consists of currency, coins, and checking account deposits.