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First Contact: Comparing Multiple Perspectives on Woodland Indians

from Maryland Center for History and Culture (formerly Maryland Historical Society)

Program image

What does a historian do? During this program students will step into the role of junior historian. Students will examine and compare written and visual first hand accounts created by European Colonists and objects used by Native Americans in order to understand the importance of analyzing multiple points of view. From perspective to reliability, students will gain the skills necessary to identify and analyze primary sources.

Program Rating

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About This Program

Cost

Point to Point: $125.00
By Request: $125.00



Length

50-60 minutes


Target Audience

Education: Grade(s) 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, Adult LearnersPublic Library: Library Patrons

Minimum participants:

5

Maximum participants:

40


Primary Disciplines

Social Studies/History, Language Arts/English, Literacy, Reading, Gifted & Talented


Program Delivery Mode

Videoconference - H.323 (Polycom, Cisco/Tandberg, LifeSize, etc...)
Videoconference – Webcam/desktop (Zoom, Google Meet, Cisco WebEx, GoToMeeting, Microsoft Teams, Blue Jeans, etc...)
Zoom


Booking Information

Programs are offered Tuesday through Friday.

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Receive this program and 9 more for one low price when you purchase the CILC Virtual Expeditions package. Learn more

For more information contact CILC at (507) 388-3672

Provider's Cancellation Policy

The full fee will be charged to sites that cancel with less than 24 hours notice. We will not charge for programs canceled due to inclement weather.

The Maryland Center for History and Culture (formerly the Maryland Historical Society) offers dynamic, interactive programs on topics in United States history for K-12, collegiate, and adult audiences. By exploring and discussing original historical evidence, including documents, images, artifacts, and audio and video clips, participants draw conclusions about important compelling questions about our nation's past.

Contact:
Ashlee Anderson
aanderson@mdhistory.org
410-685-3750x317

Program Details

Format

1. This program begins with the students discussing where they have learned what Native Americans look like and some of the misconceptions.
2. Students then discuss the different between primary and secondary sources and the reliability of primary sources.
3. Students will then compare two primary sources written by European Colonists that express their perspectives on Native Americans. Students will compare the sources and create their own secondary source drawings based off these eye-witness accounts.
4. Students will then analyze drawings of Native Americans created by European Colonists and compare them to the written sources they have read and their own drawings.
5. Students will then learn about the Native Americans by observing the objects they would have used on a day to day basis.
6. The lesson closes with a discussion about the challenges and benefits of using primary sources.

Objectives

•Students will explore the nature of primary sources and will practice the skills needed to identify and analyze a primary source.
•Students will examine the concepts of perspective and reliability.
•Students will learn about the Eastern Woodland Indians living in Maryland in 1634.
•Students will be exposed to primary sources and artifacts from the Maryland Historical Society’s collection.

Standards Alignment

National Standards

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.5.RI.1 -- Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.5.RI.4 -- Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.5.RI.6 -- Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.5.RI.7 -- Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.5.SL.1 -- Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.5.SL.1b -- Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.5.SL.2 -- Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. This program can be adapted for various grade This program can be adapted for various grade levels. Outlined below are the 5th grade benchmarks and standards met by this program.

COMMON CORE
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.1: Quote Accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.4: Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.
CCSS.ELA.LITERACY.RI.5.6: Describe how a narrator's or speaker's point of view influences how events are described.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.7: Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussion (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.B: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.2: Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

UNITED STATES HISTORY CONTENT STANDARDS
Era 2: Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)

C3 FRAMEWORK FOR SOCIAL STUDIES
D1.5.3-5: Determine the kinds of sources that will be helpful in answering compelling and supporting questions, taking into consideration the different opinions people have about how to answer the questions.
D2.His.4.3-5: Explain why individuals and groups during the same historical period differed in their perspectives.
D2.His.5.3-5: Explain connections among historical contexts and people perspectives at the time.
D2.His.6.305: Describe how people's perspectives shaped the historical sources they created.
D2.His.10.305: Compare information provided by different historical sources about the past.

State Standards

This program can be adapted for various grade levels. Outlined below are the 5th grade benchmarks and standards met by this program.

Maryland Content Standards:
Grade 5:
Standard 2.A.1.a: Describe how environment and location influenced the cultures and lifestyles.
Standard 2.B.1.a: Compare perspectives of Native Americans, Africans, and the European explorers

Grade 4:
Standard 5.A.2.b: Describe Native American societies indigenous to Maryland after European contact.