Program Flyer: #DiscoverDL: American Voices: Song and Citizenship in the U.S.A.


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Content Provider
Contact Information
Mike Dee
mdee@msmnyc.edu
120 Claremont Avenue
New York, NY  10027
Phone: 21274928024514
Program Title
#DiscoverDL: American Voices: Song and Citizenship in the U.S.A.
Program Type
Individual Program
Program Rating
This program has not yet been evaluated.
Target Audience
Education: Grade(s) 11, 12, Adult LearnersPublic Library: Library Patrons
Maximum Number of Participants
30
Minimum Number of Participants
4
Primary Disciplines
Social Studies/History, Fine Arts, Performing Arts
Program Description
What do the songs and music you listen to say about you? What does a musical artist’s music say about themselves? Join MSM Distance Learning for “American Voices: Song and Citizenship in the U.S.A.” in which we explore American song throughout the 20th century,  and  how songwriters have used their music to foster social change or promote American cultural and national identity, within the backdrop of major political and cultural movements of the 20th Century, including the Gilded Age, Progressivism, WWII, the Civil Rights Era, and Globalism. Live and historic performances ranging from Bel Canto Opera,  New Orleans Jazz, Gospel, and Pop Music will be presented in this not-to-miss exploration of American culture as seen through the lens of history and music.  
Program Format
A Manhattan School of Music teaching artist will lead an interactive presentation featuring:
- several full-class activities
- small-group activity
- summary discussion
Objectives
1. Be able to identify 20th century genres popular in American History: Opera, American songbook, Jazz (blues), Gospel, Folk, Rock, R&B, and pop music
2. Understand the American historical context of musical genres introduced
3. Analyze music content and discern possible social meanings/interpretations
4. Experience the social power of group music-making with movement and improvisation
5. Understand power of song and its possible social consequences
6. Consider and discuss messages in music to which students listen
National/Common Core Standards to which this program aligns
NATIONAL STANDARDS
COMMON CORE ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS STANDARDS – HISTORY/SOCIAL STUDIES

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.3: Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.6: Evaluate authors' differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors' claims, reasoning, and evidence.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.9: Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

NATIONAL ARTS LEARNING STANDARDS

MU:Re7.2.C.Ia-IIIa Analyze aurally the elements of music (including form) of musical works, relating them to style, mood, and context, and describe how the analysis provides models for personal growth as composer, performer, and/or listener.

MU:Re8.1.C.Ia-IIIa Develop and explain interpretations of varied works, demonstrating an understanding of the composers’ intent by citing technical and expressive aspects as well as the style/genre of each work.

MU:Re9.1.C.Ia-IIIa Describe the effectiveness of the technical and expressive aspects of selected music and performances, demonstrating understanding of fundamentals of music theory.

MU:Re9.1.C.Ib-IIIb Describe the way(s) in which critiquing others’ work and receiving feedback from others can be applied in the personal creative process.

MU:Cn10.0.C.Ia-IIIb Demonstrate how interests, knowledge, and skills relate to personal choices and intent when creating, performing, and responding to music

MU:Cn11.0.C.Ia-IIIb Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the other arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life.
State/Regional Standards to which this program aligns
NEW YORK STATE STANDARDS


NEW YORK STATE K-12 SOCIAL STUDIES FRAMEWORK


11.5 INDUSTRIALIZATION AND URBANIZATION (1870 – 1920): The United States was transformed from an agrarian to an increasingly industrial and urbanized society. Although this transformation created new economic opportunities, it also created societal problems that were addressed by a variety of reform efforts. (Standards: 1, 3, 4, 5; Themes: TCC, GEO, SOC, CIV, TECH)

11.6 THE RISE OF AMERICAN POWER (1890 – 1920): Numerous factors contributed to the rise of the United States as a world power. Debates over the United States’ role in world affairs increased in response to overseas expansion and involvement in World War I. United States participation in the war had important effects on American society. (Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4: Themes: GEO, SOC, GOV, ECO)

11.7 PROSPERITY AND DEPRESSION (1920 – 1939): The 1920s and 1930s were a time of cultural and economic changes in the nation. During this period, the nation faced significant domestic challenges, including the Great Depression. (Standards: 1, 4; Themes: ID, TCC, SOC, CIV)

11.8. WORLD WAR II (1935 – 1945): The participation of the United States in World War II was a transformative event for the nation and its role in the world. (Standards: 1, 2; Themes: TCC, GOV, CIV, TECH)

11.9 COLD WAR (1945 – 1990): In the period following World War II, the United States entered into an extended era of international conflict called the Cold War which influenced foreign and domestic policy for more than 40 years. (Standards: 1, 2, 3; Themes: TCC, GOV, ECON)

11.10 SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHANGE/DOMESTIC ISSUES (1945 – present): Racial, gender, and socioeconomic inequalities were addressed by individuals, groups, and organizations. Varying political philosophies prompted debates over the role of the federal government in regulating the economy and providing a social safety net. (Standards: 1, 4, 5; Themes: ID, TCC, SOC, GOV, CIV, ECO)

11.11 THE UNITED STATES IN A GLOBALIZING WORLD (1990 – present) The United States’ political and economic status in the world has faced external and internal challenges related to international conflicts, economic competition, and globalization. Throughout this time period, the nation has continued to debate and define its role in the world. (Standards: 1, 2, 4, 5; Themes: TCC, GOV, CIV, TECH, EXCH)

12.G1 FOUNDATIONS of AMERICAN DEMOCRACY: The principles of American democracy are reflected in the Constitution and the Bill of Rights and in the organization and actions of federal, state, and local government entities. The interpretation and application of American democratic principles continue to evolve and be debated.

12.G2 CIVIL RIGHTS and CIVIL LIBERTIES: The United States Constitution aims to protect individual freedoms and rights that have been extended to more groups of people over time. These rights and freedoms continue to be debated, extended to additional people, and defined through judicial interpretation. In engaging in issues of civic debate, citizens act with an appreciation of differences and are able to participate in constructive dialogue with those who hold different perspectives.

12.G3 RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, AND DUTIES OF CITIZENSHIP: Active, engaged, and informed citizens are critical to the success of the United States representative democracy. United States citizens have certain rights, responsibilities, and duties, the fulfillment of which help to maintain the healthy functioning of the national, state, and local communities.

12.G4 POLITICAL AND CIVIC PARTICIPATION: There are numerous avenues for engagement in the political process, from exercising the power of the vote, to affiliating with political parties, to engaging in other forms of civic participation. Citizens leverage both electoral and non-electoral means to participate in the political process.

12.G5 PUBLIC POLICY: All levels of government—local, state, and federal—are involved in shaping public policy and responding to public policy issues, all of which influence our lives beyond what appears in the Constitution. Engaged citizens understand how to find, monitor, evaluate, and respond to information on public policy issues.


NEW YORK STATE ARTS LEARNING STANDARDS


Standard 1: Creating, Performing, and Participating in the Arts: Students will actively engage in the processes that constitute creation and performance in the arts (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts) and participate in various roles in the arts.

Standard 3: Responding to and Analyzing Works of Art: Students will respond critically to a variety of works in the arts, connecting the individual work to other works and to other aspects of human endeavor and thought.

Standard 4: Understanding the Cultural Contributions of the Arts: Students will develop an understanding of the personal and cultural forces that shape artistic communication and how the arts in turn shape the diverse cultures of past and present society.
Program Length
60 minutes or 1 class period
Program Cost
View Only: 200.00
Point to Point: $200.00
Program Fee Notes
Cancellation Policy
Cancellation Policy Cancellations must be made at least two (2) business days prior to videoconference session. Failure to do so will result in a cancellation fee equivalent to the program fee. Weather Policy In the event of severe, inclement weather preventing a scheduled videoconference session from occurring, Manhattan School of Music and partner will reschedule the conference in a timely manner so that the educational collaboration may continue. Manhattan School of Music and partner agree to notify one another should there be a forecast for severe, inclement weather at their respective location. Please contact Mike Dee at mdee@msmnyc.edu immediately to coordinate appropriate action. Technical Troubleshooting Policy In the event of technical malfunctions or disruptions that arise before or during a scheduled videoconference session due to network carrier(s) services or videoconferencing technologies on the Manhattan School of Music or partner premises, Manhattan School of Music and partner technical support services will make every effort to remedy these issues in a timely, cooperative, and efficient manner so that the scheduled conferences may proceed as scheduled. If it is determined that the session cannot proceed, Manhattan School of Music and partner agree to reschedule the conference in a timely manner so that the educational collaboration may continue.
Is recording allowed?
No

Program Delivery Mode(s)
Videoconference - H.323 (Polycom, Cisco/Tandberg, LifeSize, etc...)
Videoconference – Webcam/desktop (Zoom, Skype, iChat, FieldTripZoom, Vidyo, Movi/Jabber, Blue Jeans, etc...)
Zoom

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For additional assistance, phone 507-388-3672.






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