0

Mesopotamia - Journey to the City

by  Penn Museum

Program image

What were the origins of the earliest cities? Students will learn about the ancient innovations that helped create the first permanent human settlements by studying ancient Mesopotamian artifacts. Along the way, they’ll learn how cities founded thousands of years ago were not that different than cities today and use that as inspiration to design their own cities. Recommended program materials: handout and writing utensil.

Program Rating

   based on 16 evaluation(s).
Book it!

About This Program

Cost

By Request: $150.00
By Request Premium: $150.00


Cost: (30 students per workshop)
• $150.00 for each Virtual Workshop

Based on Class Size:
• 1-30 students are recognized as one class
• 30-60 students are recognized as two classes
• 60-90 students are recognized as three classes

Discount:
• We are able to assist Title 1 schools that need full or participial sponsorship for virtual visits. For more information, please contact the Assistant Director of Virtual Programs.

Length

45-60 minutes


Target Audience

Education: Grade(s) 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, Parent, Adult Learners, Homeschool/Family , Learning PodPublic Library: Library Patrons

Minimum participants:

2

Maximum participants:

30 per session


Primary Disciplines

Art, Culture, Language Arts/English, Literacy, Problem Solving, Religion, Social Studies/History, Technology/Information Science, Writing


Program Delivery Mode

Videoconference - H.323 (Polycom, Cisco/Tandberg, LifeSize, etc...)
Videoconference – Webcam/desktop (Zoom, Google Meet, Cisco WebEx, GoToMeeting, Microsoft Teams, etc...)Be in touch, as we have procedures to enter as gue



Booking Information

Available Monday - Friday with a minimum of three weeks notice. Please contact Kevin D. Impellizeri, PhD, Assistant Director of Virtual Programs for more information and possible dates/times.

Book it!

Receive this program and 9 more for one low price when you purchase the CILC Virtual Expeditions package. Learn more

For more information contact CILC at (507) 388-3672

Provider's Cancellation Policy

Please notify the Assistant Director of Virtual Programs (virtualprograms@pennmuseum.org) of any alterations or cancellations at least two weeks in advance.

Cancellations made two weeks or more in advance will receive a full refund of the deposit. Please contact the Assistant Director of Virtual Programs if you need to change the date or time of your program.

No contact and/or multiple late cancellations may result in a school’s inability to book future visits.

About This Provider

Content Provider logo

 

Penn Museum

Philadelphia, PA
United States

Open to all, the Museum is home to remarkable objects
and powerful stories that emerge from its excavations and research
across the world.


Connect with the cultures of Africa, Asia, the Americas, and the
Mediterranean, from the very first cities of the Middle East to the
pharaohs of ancient Egypt; from early Mexico to the lives of Native
American communities today.


Experience the richness of the ancient past, gain an understanding of
our shared humanity, and find your own place in the arc of human
history.

Contact:
Kevin D. Impellizeri
kimpell@upenn.edu
2158988706

Program Details

Format

1. Pre-Lesson: Introduction to the Penn Museum
2. A brief history of Mesopotamia
3. Let's visit Ur, an ancient Mesopotamian city
4. Life in Ur: Social Structure
5. Life in Ur: Religion, Government, and Law
6. Life in Ur: Games and Recreation
6. Conclusion and questions

Objectives

Big Question: What innovations led to the creation of cities?
Objectives
By the end of this lesson, students should be able to…
• Draw inferences about life in ancient Mesopotamian cities based on examining artifacts.
• Study artifacts to track the evolution of human settlements from hunter-gatherers to cities.
• Compare and contrast religion, culture, and society in ancient Mesopotamian cities to the present.

Standards Alignment

National Standards

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.11-12.RH.1 -- Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.11-12.RH.7 -- Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.3.RI.1 -- Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.3.RI.7 -- Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.4.RI.1 -- Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.4.RI.7 -- Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it a
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.5.RI.1 -- Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.5.RI.7 -- Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.6-8.RH.1 -- Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.6.RI.1 -- Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.6.RI.7 -- Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.7.RI.1 -- Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.8.RI.1 -- Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.9-10.RH.1 -- Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.9-10.RI.1 -- Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.9-10.RI.7 -- Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g., a person’s life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.World History Content Standards, Grades 5-12 (https://phi.history.ucla.edu/nchs/world-history-content-standards/):
World History Era 1: The Beginnings of Human Society Giving Shape to World History
• 2A 7-12: Identify areas in Southwest Asia and the Nile valley where early farming communities probably appeared and analyze the environmental and technological factors that made possible experiments with farming in these regions.
• 2B 7-12: Analyze how peoples of West Africa, Europe, Southeast Asia, East Asia, and the Americas domesticated food plants and developed agricultural communities in response to local needs and conditions.
World History Era 2: Early Civilizations and the Emergence of Pastoral Peoples, 4000-1000 BCE
• 1A 9-12: Describe architectural, artistic, literary, technological, and scientific achievements of these civilizations and relate these achievements to economic and social life.
• 1A 7-12: Compare the development of religious and ethical belief systems in the three civilizations and how they legitimized the political and social order.
• 1A 5-12: Compare the forms of writing that developed in the three civilizations and how written records shaped political, legal, religious, and cultural life
• 4A: 7-12 Describe fundamental inventions, discoveries, techniques, and institutions that appeared during this period and assess the significance of bronze technology for economic, cultural, and political life.

State Standards

Please contact the Assistant Director of Virtual Programs for more information on state or region specific standards.