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Western Movies 101 (Part I)

from Booth Museum

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Booth Museum's Historian, Jim Dunham, will get us up to speed on the early history of Western movies beginning with “The Great Train Robbery” of 1903. The movie is less than ten minutes long but it included most of the standard elements that defined Western movies for the next 100 plus years. He will profile stars like William S. Hart, who was unable to translate his silent performances to the age of “talkies,” and Tom Mix, who easily made the transition. Bill Pickett, Will Rogers through Gary Cooper’s 1929 starring role in “The Virginian” will also be highlighted. He will end the era by looking at the first Western to win Best Picture – “Cimarron” in 1931

Program Rating

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About This Program

Cost

Multipoint: $95.00
Multipoint Premium: $95.00
View Only: 75.00
View Only Premium: $70.00
Point to Point: $95.00
Point to Point Premium: $90.00
By Request: $95.00
By Request Premium: $90.00



Length

About 50 minutes


Target Audience

Education: Adult Learners lifelong learners Public Library: Library Patrons

Minimum participants:

5

Maximum participants:

100


Primary Disciplines

Social Studies/History, Fine Arts, Performing Arts film history


Program Delivery Mode

Videoconference – Webcam/desktop (Zoom, Google Meet, Cisco WebEx, GoToMeeting, Microsoft Teams, Blue Jeans, etc...)
Google Hang Out
Zoom
WebEx
Microsoft Teams



Booking Information

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Receive this program and 9 more for one low price when you purchase the CILC Virtual Expeditions package. Learn more

For more information contact CILC at (507) 388-3672

Provider's Cancellation Policy

Programs are non-refundable, however cancellations due to technical difficulties, school or center closings, or those received 48 hours in advance may be rescheduled for no additional charge. Rescheduling is subject to availability.

About This Provider

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Booth Museum

Cartersville, GA
United States

The Booth Museum, in Association with the Smithsonian Institution, is a 120,000 square foot museum located in Cartersville, Georgia. The Booth is home to the largest collection of American Western artwork on exhibition in the nation, including historical and contemporary American Indian art and artifacts. Open since August 2003, Booth Museum is the only museum of its kind in the Southeast and was ranked at the #1 art museum in the nation by USA Today, Readers Choice Awards. It was also named the 2016 Escape to the Southeast Travel Attraction of the Year from the Southeast Tourism Society.

The Booth offers interactive virtual field trips infusing the arts with other disciplines such as social studies, history, science, language arts, literacy and STEAM.  Programs are book on demand and will engage your students in hands-on learning while appealing to multiple learning styles.  Lifelong learning programs are also available with special program topics available upon request.

Contact:
Patty Dees
pattyd@boothmuseum.org
7706076372

Program Details

Format

Booth Museum's Historian, Jim Dunham, will get us up to speed on the early history of Western movies beginning with “The Great Train Robbery” of 1903. The movie is less than ten minutes long but it included most of the standard elements that defined Western movies for the next 100 plus years. He will profile stars like William S. Hart, who was unable to translate his silent performances to the age of “talkies,” and Tom Mix, who easily made the transition. Bill Pickett, Will Rogers through Gary Cooper’s 1929 starring role in “The Virginian” will also be highlighted. He will end the era by looking at the first Western to win Best Picture – “Cimarron” in 1931.

After each section, Jim will engage audiences in Q & A. Time is also set aside at the end of the program for more Q & A.

Objectives

- explore film history of American Western movie genre
- develop an appreciation of historical movie posters as an art form
- explore the changing role of actors from silent movies to "talkies"