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Beyond the Civil War: Buffalo Soldiers on the American Frontier and Overseas, 1866-1916

by  National Museum of the U.S. Army

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Generations of African Americans have fought for the protection of the United States, but it would not be until the Civil War that they would serve in an official capacity. Due to their exemplary service, a Congressional Act passed on July 28, 1866 that created six new regiments comprised of all black enlisted men with predominately white officers. Later condensed to four regiments, they would come to be known as the “Buffalo Soldiers.”

These Soldiers played a decisive role in the U.S. Army on the western frontier and overseas operations. The courage and determination of the Soldiers in spite of segregation at home would pave the way towards achieving integration and full civil rights in the future.

In this Virtual Field Trip, examine the commitment, challenges, and sacrifices of Buffalo soldier immediately following the Civil War and continuing through the Spanish American War. This Virtual Field Trip is supported by the U.S. Army Women’s Museum and the Frontier Army Museum.

Program Rating

This program has not yet been evaluated.

About This Program

Cost

Point to Point: $0.00
Point to Point Premium: $0.00

FREE!



Length

45 minutes


Target Audience

Education: Grade(s) 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, Teacher(s)/Educator(s), Parent, Adult LearnersPublic Library: Library Patrons, Library Staff

Minimum participants:

10

Maximum participants:

50


Primary Disciplines

Social Studies/History


Program Delivery Mode

Videoconference – Webcam/desktop (Zoom, Google Meet, Cisco WebEx, GoToMeeting, Microsoft Teams, etc...)



Booking Information

This program can be reserved Monday - Sunday, 9 - 3:30 p.m. EDT.

Sorry, this program is not currently available. To inquire about future availability, please contact National Museum of the U.S. Army

Receive this program and 9 more for one low price when you purchase the CILC Virtual Expeditions package. Learn more

For more information contact CILC at (507) 388-3672

Provider's Cancellation Policy

Cancellations must be made 48 hours prior to the start of the program.

About This Provider

Content Provider logo

 

National Museum of the U.S. Army

Fort Belvoir, VA
United States

The National Museum of the United States Army provides the only comprehensive portrayal of Army history and traditions through the eyes of the American Soldier. Through preserving, interpreting, and exhibiting invaluable artifacts, the National Army Museum creates learning opportunities for all visitors and bonds the American people to their oldest military service.

We are America’s Army Museum.

Program Details

Format

This program guides participants through an examination of primary resources and demonstrations to learn about the accomplishments, sacrifice, and commitments of the Buffalo Soldiers. Participants will be encouraged to look closely and think critically about primary sources and artifacts. Time will be allowed for questions and answers.

Objectives

At the end of this lesson students, will be able to:

- Recognize the commitment, challenges, and sacrifices of Buffalo Soldiers.
- Understand how African Americans have used military service as a strategy to advance civil rights.
- Describe the U.S. Army’s role in westward expansion and the Indian Wars.

Standards Alignment

National Standards

Common Core Standards

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

State Standards

History and Social Science Standards of Learning for Virginia Public Schools

United States History: 1865 to the Present:
USII.4 The student will apply social science skills to understand how life changed after the Civil War by
Examining the reasons for westward expansion, including its impact on American Indians;
Describing racial segregation, the rise of “Jim Crow,” and other constraints faced by African Americans and other groups in the post-Reconstruction South.