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Abraham Lincoln and the Passage of the Thirteenth Amendment

from Educate.Today

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It’s January 1865. Abraham Lincoln has just been re-elected President of the United States in November of 1864. With the Union public hoping against hope for an end to the seemingly endless Civil War and results on the battlefield looking to make that result more and more likely, President Lincoln decides to move forward for passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, the historic legislation to end slavery in America. This program will focus on the story of the passage of this historic legislation.

In conjunction with their upcoming Social Action Campaign, “Stand Tall: Live Like Lincoln,” which kicked off on February 12, Steven Spielberg’s critically acclaimed film “Lincoln,” a DreamWorks Pictures/Twentieth Century Fox film, in association with Participant Media, will be distributed to all middle and high schools, both public and private, throughout the United States when the film becomes available on DVD. As part of that initiative, this program will include excerpts from the film Lincoln as well as pre-recorded interview excerpts from Steven Spielberg, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Tony Kushner and others. Students will also interact with, and ask questions of, Lincoln scholars joining us for the program.

The program will focus on three major areas related to passage of the Thirteenth Amendment. First, we’ll look at Lincoln’s motives for the amendment. Why did he believe it was necessary when he had already issued the Emancipation Proclamation? Second, we’ll explore the timing of the historic passage. The Amendment had already passed in the Senate in the spring of 1864 but failed that same spring in the House of Representatives. Flush with re-election victory and an increased number of Republicans elected to the new Congress that was set to start its session in March of 1865, why did Lincoln decide to pursue passage in January 1865 in a lame duck final session of the outgoing Congress rather than waiting until March? And third, we’ll explore the political process of getting the legislation through the House of Representatives. What deals were made? What politicians made a difference?

Join us for this exciting exploration. Ask your questions of archivists and historians and bring history to life!

How To View the Program:
People can join the program live in any of three ways:

1. Via videconference--We have interactive and view only videoconference slots available for student groups to join the program. Groups interested in connecting this way will need a videoconference unit at their facility, and we would need to test your connection with our bridge at MOREnet ahead of the program using the IP address you'd use to connect on the program day. Interactive slots get face to face question and answer time with the program guests; view only slots can e-mail questions and comments during the program to live@hectv.org. These slots are limited so early enrollment is highly recommended. For videoconference participation, we must have you enrolled no later than March 14, 2013. Contact us at live@hectv.org.

2. Via Internet--All our HEC-TV Live! programs are streamed live via the station website, http://www.hectv.org, on the program day. For our programs focused on President Lincoln and the Thirteenth Amendment at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. on March 21 just go to our home page at the program time and the program will run on that page. Since many schools limit streaming video through their firewalls, we recommend testing your ability to view the stream prior to the program by watching one of HEC-TV’s archived programs at http://www.hectv.org. We also recommend viewing the program live on one computer only and connecting that computer to a television or digital projector for classroom viewing. Viewers can e-mail their questions and comments during the program to us at live@hectv.org. To receive curriculum materials designed to help you prepare your students for the program, just e-mail us prior to the program at live@hectv.org. Viewing in this way is unlimited; no other sign-in is required unless you wish to receive program prep materials. If the session is listed as full for videoconference participation, we welcome your participation this way as well.

3. Via Television--All our programs are available in the St. Louis metropolitan area on HEC-TV, Charter Communications digital channels 989 or 118-26. All our programs can also be seen on AT&T’s U-Verse channel 99. Students viewing in this way can e-mail their questions during the program to live@hectv.org. To view the show live on the program day, just turn on your TV to the appropriate channel.

For Internet and TV viewing, there is no enrollment deadline date. We would appreciate knowing the time of the program you are watching and the grade level and amount of students involved so we can forward that information to our program partners. Such information is extremely helpful in securing funding for more free, interactive, educational programs in the future. To let us know you’re viewing the program or to answer any additional questions about the program, please contact us at live@hectv.org.

Archival Viewing:
Can’t join us live? No problem! All HEC-TV Live! programs are archived on the station website, http://www.hectv.org and on the HEC-TV page on iTunesU for on-demand viewing at any time. Archives are usually up and running about a week after the program's original air date.

More on the “Stand Tall: Live Like Lincoln: Project:
In conjunction with their upcoming Social Action Campaign, “Stand Tall: Live Like Lincoln,” which kicked off on February 12, Steven Spielberg’s critically acclaimed film “Lincoln,” a DreamWorks Pictures/Twentieth Century Fox film, in association with Participant Media, will be distributed to all middle and high schools, both public and private, throughout the United States when the film becomes available on DVD. Participant Media, DreamWorks Pictures and Fox/Newscorp are funding the unparalleled effort with Disney In-Home creating the packaging and Disney Educational Productions handling the distribution. Compiled and designed by Disney Educational Productions, the DVD package each school will receive includes an Educator’s Guide to help teachers engage in meaningful discussions and complete lesson plans relating to the significance of Abraham Lincoln’s leadership and the importance of that period in our nation’s history.

Program Rating

   based on 7 evaluation(s).


About This Program

Cost

Multipoint: $0.00
Multipoint Premium: $0.00
View Only: 0.00
View Only Premium: $0.00

FREE!


There is NO CHARGE for this program.

Length

60 minutes


Target Audience

Education: Grade(s) 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Minimum participants:

There is no minimum number required for participation.

Maximum participants:

For optimum interactivity, we recommend no more than two classes combined.


Primary Disciplines

Social Studies/History


Program Delivery Mode

Videoconference - H.323 (Polycom, Cisco/Tandberg, LifeSize, etc...)
Videoconference – Webcam/desktop (Zoom, Google Meet, Cisco WebEx, GoToMeeting, Microsoft Teams, Blue Jeans, etc...)



Booking Information

Sorry, this program is not currently available. To inquire about future availability, please contact Educate.Today

Receive this program and 9 more for one low price when you purchase the CILC Virtual Expeditions package. Learn more

For more information contact CILC at (507) 388-3672

Provider's Cancellation Policy

Since there may well be a waiting list for interactive participation, we ask that you let us know of your need to cancel as soon as you know.

About This Provider

Content Provider logo

 

Educate.Today

St Louis, MO
United States

Student and educator focused and standards-based, our interactive programs, videos and related curriculum resources authentically link students and the curriculum they study to individuals and organizations who are applying that curriculum in the real world. We offer on-demand interactive programs whose content and time frame are designed to best meet your students’ learning needs.

Contact:
Helen Headrick
helen@educate.today
3145314455

Program Details

Format

The videoconference program will consist of the following segments. Student questions and comments for our expert guests will be included in each segment of the program. The program will include excerpts from the film Lincoln as well as pre-recorded interview excerpts from Steven Spielberg, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Tony Kushner and others.

1. Welcome and Introduction—Student groups and experts will be introduced and welcomed to the program.

2. The Need for the Amendment—We’ll explore Lincoln’s motives for wanting the Amendment to become part of the Constitution. As part of the segment, students will share their thoughts on Big Picture Question One for the program that is included with the pre-program activities in this document. If you wish your students to present their thoughts on that question, be sure to follow the procedures included in that pre-program activity for submitting their ideas to us before the program.

3. Timing of the Passage—This segment will focus on Lincoln’s decision to push for passage in the House of Representatives by the end of January 1865. As part of the segment, students will share their thoughts on Big Picture Question Two for the program that is included with the pre-program activities in this document. If you wish your students to present their thoughts on that question, be sure to follow the procedures included in that pre-program activity for submitting their ideas to us before the program.


4. Politics of the Process—This segment will focus on the political process of getting the amendment through the House. Why were some opposed to the amendment? What deals were made to change minds? What politicians made a difference? As part of the segment, students will share their thoughts on Big Picture Questions Three and Four for the program that are included with the pre-program activities in this document. If you wish your students to present their thoughts on that question, be sure to follow the procedures included in that pre-program activity for submitting their ideas to us before the program.

5. Closing Segment--Including summary of topics discussed and final questions from students.

Objectives

1. The participant will explore the reasons for a Constitutional amendment to end slavery and evaluate the impact of its passage.
2. The participant will interact with primary source documents and interpret how they impact his/her understanding of a particular historic subject.
3. The participant will engage in a discussion about different groups’ perspectives related to the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment.
4. The participant will engage in critical thinking related to issues concerning the passage of the Amendment while participating in a program on that topic.

Standards Alignment

National Standards

Featured National Standards (History):

Grades 5-12:
Historical Thinking Standards

1. Chronological Thinking
B. Identify the temporal structure of a historical narrative or story: its beginning, middle, and end (the latter defined as the outcome of a particular beginning).
E. Interpret data presented in time lines and create time lines by designating appropriate equidistant intervals of time and recording events according to the temporal order in which they occurred.

2. Historical Comprehension
A. Identify the author or source of the historical document or narrative and assess its credibility.
B. Reconstruct the literal meaning of a historical passage by identifying who was involved, what happened, where it happened, what events led to these developments, and what consequences or outcomes followed.
C. Identify the central question(s) the historical narrative addresses and the purpose, perspective, or point of view from which it has been constructed.
D. Differentiate between historical facts and historical interpretations but acknowledge that the two are related; that the facts the historian reports are selected and reflect therefore the historian’s judgment of what is most significant about the past.
E. Read historical narratives imaginatively, taking into account what the narrative reveals of the humanity of the individuals and groups involved--their probable values, outlook, motives, hopes, fears, strengths, and weaknesses.
F. Appreciate historical perspectives--(a) describing the past on its own terms, through the eyes and experiences of those who were there, as revealed through their literature, diaries, letters, debates, arts, artifacts, and the like; (b) considering the historical context in which the event unfolded--the values, outlook, options, and contingencies of that time and place; and (c) avoiding “present-mindedness,” judging the past solely in terms of present-day norms and values.

4. Historical Research Capabilities
A. Formulate historical questions from encounters with historical documents, eyewitness accounts, letters, diaries, artifacts, photos, historical sites, art, architecture, and other records from the past.
B. Obtain historical data from a variety of sources, including: library and museum collections, historic sites, historical photos, journals, diaries, eyewitness accounts, newspapers, and the like; documentary films, oral testimony from living witnesses, censuses, tax records, city directories, statistical compilations, and economic indicators.
C. Interrogate historical data by uncovering the social, political, and economic context in which it was created; testing the data source for its credibility, authority, authenticity, internal consistency and completeness; and detecting and evaluating bias, distortion, and propaganda by omission, suppression, or invention of facts.
F. Support interpretations with historical evidence in order to construct closely reasoned arguments rather than facile opinions.

5. Historical Issues—Analysis and Decision-Making
A. Identify issues and problems in the past and analyze the interests, values, perspectives, and points of view of those involved in the situation.

State Standards

Schools from across the country are invited to join in the program. Missouri state standards are provided for Missouri schools since partial funding for this program comes from the Missouri Humanities Council.

Show Me Performance Standards:
Goal 1 – 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9
Goal 2 - 1, 2, 4, 7
Goal 3 - 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Goal 4 - 1, 5, 6

Social Studies Knowledge Standards - 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
Communication Knowledge Standards - 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7