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America's Presidents --FREE Program

from Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery

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How has presidential portraiture changed since the days of George Washington? The National Portrait Gallery is proud to hold the only complete collection of presidential portraits outside of the White House. This program introduces students to the “America’s Presidents” exhibition and investigates the diverse ways in which presidents have been portrayed in portraiture over the past two centuries.


Franklin D. Roosevelt (1945)

by Douglas Granville Chandor 

Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery

Program Rating

This program has not yet been evaluated.


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About This Program

Cost

Multipoint: $0.00
Multipoint Premium: $0.00

FREE!



Length

30-60 minutes based on your needs


Target Audience

Education: Grade(s) 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 Homeschool students

Minimum participants:

10

Maximum participants:

50


Primary Disciplines

Social Studies/History, Fine Arts, Language Arts/English


Program Delivery Mode

Videoconference – Webcam/desktop (Zoom, Google Meet, Cisco WebEx, GoToMeeting, Microsoft Teams, Blue Jeans, etc...)



Booking Information

Program will be offered Monday through Friday, from October 1, 2020, through May 28, 2021. The program can be thirty, forty-five, or sixty minutes in length and are offered between 9:30am (EST) and 4:00pm (EST).

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Receive this program and 9 more for one low price when you purchase the CILC Virtual Expeditions package. Learn more

For more information contact CILC at (507) 388-3672

Provider's Cancellation Policy

Cancellations must be submitted at least one week prior to the scheduled videoconference.
On the day of program, The Portrait Gallery has the right to cancel or alter the scheduled program if your group is more than 10 minutes late.

About This Provider

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Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery

Washington, DC
United States




 
            The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery tells the multifaceted story of the United States through the individuals who have shaped American culture. Spanning the visual arts, performing arts and new media, the Portrait Gallery portrays poets and presidents, visionaries and villains, actors and activists whose lives tell the American story. 

Contact:
Jocelyn Kho
npgstudentprograms@si.edu
(202) 633-8514

Program Details

Format

Videoconference presenters show portraits from the museum’s collection using the Smithsonian Learning Lab platform (https://learninglab.si.edu/org/NPG). Through inquiry-based questions and discussion, presenters engage with participants as they explore the portraits together.

Objectives

After completing the program, students will be better able to:
- Identify key components of a portrait and analyze how these components fit into the way the sitter is defined/remembered.
- Compare and contrast what different portraits reflect about how each president is portrayed and remembered.
- Identify American presidents and analyze their contributions to U.S. History.

Standards Alignment

National Standards

Key Ideas and Details:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.1
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.3
Identify key steps in a text's description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered).
Craft and Structure:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.5
Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.6
Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.7
Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.8
Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.9
Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.

Key Ideas and Details:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.1
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.2
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.3
Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.
Craft and Structure:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.5
Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.6
Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.8
Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author's claims.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.9
Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.

Key Ideas and Details:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.1
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.2
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.3
Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Craft and Structure:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.5
Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.6
Evaluate authors' differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors' claims, reasoning, and evidence.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.7
Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.8
Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.9
Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

State Standards

Maryland
Social Studies
Standard 5.0: Students will examine significant ideas, beliefs, and themes; organize patterns and events; and analyze how individuals and societies have changed over time in Maryland and the United States.
B. Emergence, Expansion and Changes in Nations and Empires
1. Analyze the growth and the development of the United States
a. Explain the political and economic impact of the Louisiana Purchase on the United States.
2. Evaluate the importance of Jacksonian Democracy and how it represented a change in the social, political and economic life of the United States
a. Explain how the philosophies and policies of the Jacksonian Era represented a move towards greater democratization.
C. Conflict between Ideas and Institutions
1. Examine and explain the role of religious, social and political institutions in America at the end of the American Revolution
a. Analyze the political effects of the American Revolution on American society and culture.
b. Describe the evolution of the American system of government from a confederal to a federal system of government.
Standard 5.2: Students will demonstrate understanding of the cultural, economic, political, social and technological developments from 1898 to 1929.
1. Analyze the cultural, economic, political, and social impact of the Progressive Movement.
e. Analyze the role of presidential power and the shaping of the modern presidency, such as the Square Deal and Roosevelt’s response to the 1902 Coal Strike.
Standard 5.3: Students will demonstrate understanding of the cultural, economic, political, social and technological developments from 1929-1945.
1. Analyze the consequences and government responses to the Great Depression .
b. Describe the responses of the Hoover administration to the Great Depression.
c. Describe the responses of the Roosevelt administration to the Great Depression.
2. Analyze the causes of World War II in Europe and the Pacific and the involvement of the United States in the war.
b. Explain the United States gradual involvement in the war in Europe through legislative and executive measures, such as Cash and Carry, Lend Lease, and the Atlantic Charter.
f. Analyze how the events, such as the Yalta and Potsdam conferences and creation of the United Nations shaped the post war world.
Standard 5.4: Students will demonstrate understanding of the cultural, economic, political, social and technological developments from 1946-1968.
2. Analyze the economic, political and social changes within the United States during the period 1946-1968.
f. Describe the overall goals of the Great Society and its programs, such as the War on Poverty and Medicare/Medicaid.

Visual arts
Standard 1.0: Students will demonstrate the ability to perceive, interpret, and respond to ideas, experiences, and the environment through visual art.
Standard 2.0: Students will demonstrate an understanding of visual arts as a basic aspect of history and human experience.

District of Columbia
Social Studies
Standard 4.6. Students describe the cooperation and conflict that existed among the Native Americans and between the Indian nations and the new settlers.
6. Identify the influence and achievements of significant leaders of the time (e.g., John Marshall, Andrew Jackson, Chief Tecumseh, Chief Logan,
Chief John Ross, and Sequoyah).
Standard 4.8: Students explain the causes of the American Revolution.
5. Identify the views, lives, and influences of key leaders during this period (e.g., King George III, Patrick Henry, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas
Jefferson, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and John Adams). (P)
Standard 4.10: Students describe the people and events associated with the development of the U.S. Constitution.
Standard 5.5: Students summarize the causes and consequences of the Civil War.
3. Describe the emergence of Abraham Lincoln as a national political figure and the secession of Southern states. (P)
Standard 5.6 Students explain the successes and failures of Reconstruction
2. Describe the assassination of Abraham Lincoln in Washington, DC. (P)
Standard 5.8: Students describe the nation’s growing role in world affairs.
Standard 5.10: Students describe what happened during the global depression of the 1930s and how the United States responded.
4. Identify and explain the New Deal programs under FDR.
5. Analyze increased importance of the federal government in establishing economic and social policies to combat societal problems.
Standard 8.3: Students analyze the political principles underlying the U.S. Constitution, and they compare the enumerated and implied powers of the federal government.
5. Describe the political philosophy underpinning the Constitution as specified in The Federalist Papers (by James Madison, Alexander Hamilton,
and John Jay), and explain the role of such leaders as James Madison, George Washington, Roger Sherman, Gouverneur Morris, and James
Wilson in the writing and ratification of the Constitution. (P)
Standard 8.9: Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people in the West from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced.
2. Describe the election of Andrew Jackson as president in 1828, the importance of Jacksonian democracy, and his actions as president (e.g., the spoils system, veto of the National Bank, and opposition to the Supreme Court).
Standard 8.10: Students analyze the issue of slavery, including the early and steady attempts to abolish slavery and to realize the ideals of the Declaration of Independence.
3. Identify the various leaders of the abolitionist movement (e.g., John Quincy Adams and his proposed constitutional amendment and the Amistad case)
Standard 8.11: Students analyze the multiple causes, key events, and complex consequences of the Civil War.
4. Describe Abraham Lincoln’s presidency and his significant writings and speeches and their relationship to the Declaration of Independence (e.g., his House Divided speech in 1858, Gettysburg Address in 1863, Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, and inaugural addresses in 1861 and 1865).
Standard 12.3: Students analyze the unique roles and responsibilities of the three branches of government as established by the U.S. Constitution.
4. Discuss Article II of the Constitution as it relates to the executive branch, including eligibility for office and length of term, election to and
removal from office, the oath of office, and the enumerated executive powers.

Visual Arts
Standard 1: Each student will understand and apply media, techniques and process in the creation and production of art.

Standard 3: Each student will choose and evaluate a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas to communicate meaning in artworks.

Virginia
Social Studies
Standard GOVT.1: The student will demonstrate mastery of the social studies skills responsible citizenship requires, including the ability to
a) analyze primary and secondary source documents;
c) analyze political cartoons, political advertisements, pictures, and other graphic media
Standard USI.1: The student will develop skills for historical and geographical analysis, including the ability to
a) identify and interpret primary and secondary source documents to increase understanding of events and life in United States history to 1877;
b) make connections between the past and the present;
c) sequence events in United States history from pre-Columbian times to 1877;
d) interpret ideas and events from different historical perspectives;
e) evaluate and discuss issues orally and in writing;
Standard USI.6: The student will demonstrate knowledge of the causes and results of the American Revolution by
c) describing key events and the roles of key individuals in the American Revolution, with emphasis on George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, and Thomas Paine;
Standard USI.7: The student will demonstrate knowledge of the challenges faced by the new nation by
describing the major accomplishments of the first five presidents of the United States.
Standard USI.9: The student will demonstrate knowledge of the causes, major events, and effects of the Civil War by
d) describing the roles of Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson, and Frederick Douglass in events leading to and during the war
Standard USII.1: The student will demonstrate skills for historical and geographical analysis and responsible citizenship, including the ability to
a) analyze and interpret primary and secondary source documents to increase understanding of events and life in United States history from 1865 to the present
b) make connections between the past and the present;
c) sequence events in United States history from 1865 to the present;
d) interpret ideas and events from different historical perspectives;
Standard USII.3: The student will demonstrate knowledge of the effects of Reconstruction on American life by
c) describing the legacies of Abraham Lincoln, Robert E. Lee, and Frederick Douglass.
Standard CE.6: The student will demonstrate knowledge of the American constitutional government at the national level by
a) describing the structure and powers of the national government;
d) describing the roles and powers of the executive branch.
Standard CE.7: The student will demonstrate knowledge of how public policy is made at the local, state, and national levels of government by:
b) describing the roles and powers of the executive branch.
Standard VS.5: The student will demonstrate knowledge of the role of Virginia in the
American Revolution by
b) identifying the various roles played by whites, enslaved African Americans, free African Americans, and American Indians in the Revolutionary War era, including George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, and James Lafayette
Standard VS.6: The student will demonstrate knowledge of the role of Virginia in the
establishment of the new American nation by
a) explaining why George Washington is called the “Father of our Country” and
James Madison is called the “Father of the Constitution”
Standard VUS.7: The student will demonstrate knowledge of the Civil War and Reconstruction Era and their importance as major turning points in American history by
b) identifying the major events and the roles of key leaders of the Civil War Era, with emphasis on Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, and Frederick Douglass;
Standard VUS.10: The student will demonstrate knowledge of key domestic events of the 1920s and 1930s by
describing how Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal relief, recovery, and reform measures addressed the Great Depression and expanded the government’s role in the economy.
Standard SVUS.13: The student will demonstrate knowledge of United States foreign policy since World War II by
d) explaining the collapse of communism and the end of the Cold War, including the role of Ronald Reagan in making foreign policy;

Visual Arts
Standard 7.19: the student will explore and identify subjects, themes, and symbols as they relate to meaning in works of art.
Standard 7.26: the student will analyze and describe how factors of time and place influence visual characteristics that give meaning and value to a work of art.