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One Person, One Vote

from Connecticut Historical Society

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Who has the right to vote in the United States? How has that changed over time? Using historical images, objects, and film, students will learn about the importance and history of voting. During this interactive program, students will cast a vote both as a citizen and as a member of a legislative body.


This program has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor.

Program Rating

This program has not yet been evaluated.


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About This Program

Cost

By Request: $100.00


Discounts available for Priority and Title 1 School Districts.

Length

45 minutes


Target Audience

Education: Grade(s) 3, 4, 5

Minimum participants:

10

Maximum participants:

30


Primary Disciplines

Social Studies/History


Program Delivery Mode

Zoom- please contact us for other platforms



Booking Information

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Receive this program and 9 more for one low price when you purchase the CILC Virtual Expeditions package. Learn more

For more information contact CILC at (507) 388-3672

Provider's Cancellation Policy

Cancellations must be made at least 48 hours prior to the scheduled virtual field trip. There is no charge if your program is cancelled due to weather or unforeseen technical problems.

About This Provider

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Connecticut Historical Society

Hartford, CT
United States

The Connecticut Historical Society is a private, independent, not-for-profit educational organization founded in 1825. Located at One Elizabeth Street in Hartford, CT, the CHS is home to a museum and library, the Waterman Research Center, and the Connecticut Cultural Heritage Arts Program - the state's folk and traditional arts initiative.

Ths CHS's mission is connecting you and the stories of Connecticut. Its vision is a society that values historical perspective and understanding as essential tools in connecting with others, shaping communities, and making informed decisions. To accomplish that, the CHS serves tens of thousands of people annually through adult, youth and family educational programs, as well as tours, exhibitions, and library and research services. The organization's renowned collection includes more than 4 million manuscripts, graphics, books, and other materials accessible at its Hartford campus and on loan at other organizations.

Contact:
Rebecca Gross
rebecca_gross@chs.org
860-236-5621, x. 232

Program Details

Format

1. The program begins with a discussion of the importance of voting and an activity to illustrate how the right to vote has changed over time.
2. Students then learn about the different things a person can vote for and take part in voting for a mock referendum.
3. Next, students take on the role of members of a legislative body and debate whether or not a bill should become a law.
4. The program concludes with a review of the topics covered and time for questions and answers.

Objectives

Students will be able to:
1. Describe how the question of who has been allowed to vote has changed over time.
2. Differentiate between the types of voting done by private citizens and by government officials.
3. Explain the importance of voting to a democratic society.

Standards Alignment

National Standards

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.3.RI.10 -- By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 2–3 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.3.SL.1 -- Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.3.SL.2 -- Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.3.SL.3 -- Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.4.RI.10 -- By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.4.SL.1 -- Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.4.SL.2 -- Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.4.SL.3 -- Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.5.RI.10 -- By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 4–5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.5.SL.1 -- Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.5.SL.2 -- Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.5.SL.3 -- Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence.

State Standards

Connecticut Social Studies Frameworks
HIST 3.2 Compare life in specific historical time periods to life today.
HIST 3.4 Explain connections among historical contexts and people’s perspectives at the time.
HIST 4.1 Explain connections among historical contexts and people’s perspectives at the time.
HIST 5.5 Explain connections among historical contexts and people’s perspectives at the time.
CIV 3.1 Distinguish the responsibilities and powers of government officials at various levels and branches of government and in different times and places.
CIV 3.2 Explain how a democracy relies on people’s responsible participation, and draw implications for how individuals should participate.
CIV 3.3 Explain how groups of people make rules to create responsibilities and protect freedoms.
CIV 3.4 Identify core civic virtues and democratic principles that guide government, society, and communities.
CIV 3.6 Explain how rules and laws change society and how people change rules and laws.
CIV 5.1 Explain how groups of people make rules to create responsibilities and protect freedoms.
CIV 5.2 Describe ways in which people benefit from and are challenged by working together, including through government, workplaces, voluntary organizations, and families.
CIV 5.3 Identify core civic virtues and democratic principles that guide government, society, and communities.
CIV 5.4 Explain how policies are developed to address public problems.