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Exploring the Civil War Through Primary Sources

from The Mariners' Museum

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In this program students will use primary sources to delve into a period of national turmoil and rapidly evolving wartime technology. The development of ironclad ships during the American Civil War was a technological advance that would forever change the face of naval warfare. Using artifacts, personal correspondence, historical artwork, and official documents, students will examine the story of the USS Monitor and the CSS Virginia and the first major battle between two ironclad vessels. Students will also be introduced to the Monitor National Marine Sanctuary and discover how the wreck site is being excavated and artifacts are being recovered and conserved here at The Mariners' Museum.

Program Rating

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About This Program

Cost

By Request: $125.00
By Request Premium: $125.00



Length

45 minutes - one hour


Target Audience

Education: Grade(s) 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Minimum participants:

no minimum

Maximum participants:

30


Primary Disciplines

Social Studies/History


Program Delivery Mode

Videoconference - H.323 (Polycom, Cisco/Tandberg, LifeSize, etc...)
Videoconference – Webcam/desktop (Zoom, Skype, iChat, Vidyo, Movi/Jabber, Blue Jeans, etc...)
Zoom



Booking Information

Please book at least 2 weeks in advance.

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Receive this program and 9 more for one low price when you purchase the CILC Virtual Expeditions package. Learn more

For more information contact CILC at (507) 388-3672

Provider's Cancellation Policy

Please cancel as soon as you know you must. At least a week in advance is preferable.

About This Provider

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The Mariners' Museum

Newport News, VA
United States

The Mariners’ Museum is located in Newport News, Virginia, but our educational reach extends far beyond our physical doors. Just as Man has used the sea to journey around the world for thousands of years, The Mariners’ now uses Interactive Videoconferencing to offer programming to schools across the country and around the globe.
The Mariners' Museum, one of the largest and most comprehensive maritime history museums in the world, houses a treasure trove of more than 35,000 items inspired by human experiences with the sea.

Contact:
Harriet Smith
hsmith@marinersmuseum.org
7575917743

Program Details

Format

The program will be structured around students examining and interpreting a range of primary sources. The primary sources will drive the overall narrative of the program.

1. The program will begin with a brief, general discussion of the reasons for the Civil War and a comparison between the economies of the North and the South.
2. The program will continue with a description of the construction of the two ironclad ships: Monitor and Virginia (formerly the Merrimack)
3. A detailed talk about the Battle of Hampton Roads will be given.
4. The students will learn about life on board navy ships during the Civil War.
5. A brief discussion about the conservation of Monitor and Virginia artifacts will be led by the instructor.

Objectives

1. The student will understand the difference between primary and secondary sources.
2 The student will gain experience in primary source interpretation..
3 The student will be able to explain the reasons the North and the South needed a strong naval force during the Civil War.
4 The student will understand the historical significance of the Battle of Hampton Roads.
5 The student will understand the importance of ironclad technology and its lasting impact on naval warfare.
6 The student will understand what life was like for sailors aboard ironclad vessels during the Civil War.
7. The student will be able to explain the sinking of the USS Monitor and current conservation efforts to protect the legacy of this cultural resource.

Standards Alignment

National Standards

National

NSS-USH.5-12.5 ERA 5: CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION (1850-1877)


Understands the causes of the Civil War
Understands the course and character of the Civil War and its effects on the American people
Understands how various reconstruction plans succeeded or failed

State Standards

Virginia
VS.1 The student will develop skills for historical and geographical analysis including the ability to
a) identify and interpret artifacts and primary and secondary source documents to understand events in history;
b) determine cause and effect relationships;
c) compare and contrast historical events;
d) draw conclusions and make generalizations;
e) make connections between past and present;
f) sequence events in Virginia history;
g) interpret ideas and events from different historical perspectives;
h) evaluate and discuss issues orally and in writing;
i) analyze and interpret maps to explain relationships among landforms, water features, climatic characteristics, and historical events.

VS.7
The student will demonstrate knowledge of the issues that divided our nation and led to the Civil War by
a) identifying the events and differences between northern and southern states that divided Virginians and led to secession, war, and the creation of West Virginia;
b) describing Virginia?s role in the war, including identifying major battles that took place in Virginia.

USI.1 The student will develop skills for historical and geographical analysis, including the ability to
a) identify and interpret primary and secondary source documents to increase understanding of events and life in United States history to 1877;
b) make connections between the past and the present;
c) sequence events in United States history from pre-Columbian times to 1877;
d) interpret ideas and events from different historical perspectives;
e) evaluate and discuss issues orally and in writing;
f) analyze and interpret maps to explain relationships among landforms, water features, climatic characteristics, and historical events;
g) distinguish between parallels of latitude and meridians of longitude;
h) interpret patriotic slogans and excerpts from notable speeches and documents.

USI.9 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the causes, major events, and effects of the Civil War by
a) describing the cultural, economic, and constitutional issues that divided the nation;
b) explaining how the issues of states? rights and slavery increased sectional tensions;
c) identifying on a map the states that seceded from the Union and those that remained in the Union;
d) describing the roles of Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas ?Stonewall? Jackson, and Frederick Douglass in events leading to and during the war;
e) using maps to explain critical developments in the war, including major battles;
f) describing the effects of war from the perspectives of Union and Confederate soldiers (including black soldiers), women, and slaves.

VUS.1 The student will demonstrate skills for historical and geographical analysis, including the ability to
a) identify, analyze, and interpret primary and secondary source documents, records, and data, including artifacts, diaries, letters, photographs, journals, newspapers, historical accounts, and art to increase understanding of events and life in the United States;
b) evaluate the authenticity, authority, and credibility of sources;
c) formulate historical questions and defend findings based on inquiry and interpretation;
d) develop perspectives of time and place, including the construction of maps and various time lines of events, periods, and personalities in American history;
e) communicate findings orally and in analytical essays and/or comprehensive papers;
f) develop skills in discussion, debate, and persuasive writing with respect to enduring issues and determine how divergent viewpoints have been addressed and reconciled;
g) apply geographic skills and reference sources to understand how relationships between humans and their environment have changed over time;
h) interpret the significance of excerpts from famous speeches and other documents.

VUS.7 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the Civil War and Reconstruction Era and its importance as a major turning point in American history by
a) identifying the major events and the roles of key leaders of the Civil War Era, with emphasis on Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, and Frederick Douglass;
b) analyzing the significance of the Emancipation Proclamation and the principles outlined in Lincoln?s Gettysburg Address;
c) examining the political, economic, and social impact of the war and Reconstruction, including the adoption of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution of the United States.