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EXPANDING BOUNDARIES. CHANGING LIVES.
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George Washington Carver - The Scientist (lab)

by  George Washington Carver National Monument

Program image

This lesson focuses on the scientific and
humanitarian work of George Washington Carver during his years at Tuskegee
Institute in Alabama. After a review of his work promoting soil conservation,
the park ranger will demonstrate how to make peanut milk, incorporating the
scientific method. Students are invited to gather materials and equipment and
follow along!

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About This Program

Cost

Multipoint: $0.00
View Only: 0.00
Point to Point: $0.00
By Request: $0.00

FREE!


free of charge; reservations required

Length

45 minutes


Target Audience

Education: Grade(s) 2, 3, 4, 5

Minimum participants:

5

Maximum participants:

30


Primary Disciplines

Social Studies/History, Sciences


Program Delivery Mode

Videoconference – Webcam/desktop (Zoom, Google Meet, Cisco WebEx, GoToMeeting, Microsoft Teams, Blue Jeans, etc...)



Booking Information

Program presented November-March, upon request, reservations required

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George Washington Carver National Monument

Diamond, MO
United States

George Washington Carver National Monument in Diamond,
Missouri is the birthplace and childhood home of George Washington Carver.
Established in 1943, it is the first unit of the National Park Service established
to honor an African American.

Contact:
Diane Eilenstein
diane_eilenstein@nps.gov
417-325-4151

Program Details

Format

This lesson focuses on the scientific and humanitarian work of George Washington Carver during his years at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. After a review of his work promoting soil conservation, the park ranger will demonstrate how to make peanut milk, incorporating the scientific method. Students are invited to gather materials and equipment and follow along!

Objectives

After attending the program, students will be able to:
identify cotton and other cash crops (tobacco, corn) as the cause of soil depletion
explain how the sharecropping system perpetuated the farming of cotton and kept many farm families in poverty
correctly explain the concept of crop rotation
know that legumes are nitrogen-fixing plants, adding nitrogen to the soil
list two or more crops Carver recommended for enriching the soil (peanuts, soybeans, cowpeas)
list two or more products George Washington Carver made from peanuts, sweet potatoes, or soybeans

Standards Alignment

National Standards

LS1B 3-5 -- Growth and development of organisms
LS2A 3-5 -- Interdependent relationships in ecosystems
LS2B 3-5 -- Cycles of matter and engergy transfer in ecosystems

State Standards

Missouri
Science
3.LS1.B.1 Develop a model to compare and contrast observations on the life cycle of different plants and animals.
5.LS1.C.1 Support an argument that plants get the materials (i.e. carbon dioxide, water, sunlight) they need for growth chiefly from air and water.
2.LS2.A.1 Plan and conduct investigations on the growth of plants when growing conditions are altered.
5.LS2.B.1 Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
3.LS3.D.1 Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.
2.ESS2.A.1 Compare multiple solutions designed to slow or prevent wind or water from changing the shape of the land.
4.ESS2.A.1 Plan and conduct scientific investigations or simulations to provide evidence how natural processes (e.g. weathering and erosion) shape Earth's surfaces.
5.ESS3.C.1 Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.

Missouri
Social Studies
2PC.1.E Describe character traits and civic attitudes of inventors or pioneers in their field who influenced progress in the nation.
2.H.3.C Describe contributions of inventors or pioneers in their field who influenced progress in the nation.
3.H.3.C.a Identify and describe the significance of the individuals from MO who have made contributions to our state and national heritage.
4.EG.5.F Identify different kinds of regions in the U.S. and analyze how their characteristics affect people who live there.
5.PC.1.E Describe character traits and civic attitudes of individuals from 1800-2000.
5.H.3.C Identify and describe the contributions of significant individuals from 1800-2000.